Sixties Scoop Network launches an innovative Mapping Project for Sixties Scoop Survivors

(Ottawa/ON) June 23, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation congratulates the Sixties Scoop Network (formerly the National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network) for launching a ground-breaking, interactive map to visualize the displacement of Sixties Scoop Survivors and share their experiences. The Sixties Scoop Network’s project, In our own Words: Mapping the Sixties Scoop Diaspora is being conducted with Dr. Raven Sinclair, a University of Regina professor who initiated the Pe-kīwēwin. The project hopes to uncover the history behind the policies that led to a disproportionate number of Indigenous children in care. It will support Survivors in finding and reconnecting with family members and accessing services and support resources.

The National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network has served as an advisor in the project created by the Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) called Bi-Giwen: Coming Home –Truth-Telling from the Sixties Scoop. This project explores the experiences of Survivors of the Sixties Scoop, which began in the 1960s and continued until the late 1980s, where Indigenous children were taken from their families, often forcibly, fostered and/or adopted out to non-Indigenous homes often far away from their communities and some across the globe. This project consists of a traveling exhibition along with an Activity Guide and features the first-person testimonies of twelve Indigenous Survivors of the Sixties Scoop, and reflects upon their enduring strength and resilience. The LHF is pleased to see another resource in addition to our own, out in the public that will raise awareness of the high rates of Indigenous child apprehension into the Child Welfare System and the impacts it has had on generations of Indigenous Peoples.

The LHF is a national Indigenous charitable organization whose purposes are to educate, raise awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, including the Sixties Scoop and the intergenerational harms caused to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. This year marks our 20-year anniversary of LHF supporting the healing process of Survivors and their families, and working with Canadians to take action to address racism and discrimination in order to promote equality and to foster Reconciliation in Canada.

For more information on the Legacy of Hope Foundation, visit legacyofhope.ca.

For more information on the Sixties Scoop Network, please contact Colleen Hele-Cardinal at sixtiesscoopmap@gmail.com.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Carleton University launches the Residential Schools Land Memory Atlas on National Indigenous Peoples Day

Ottawa, June 21, 2020 – Over 18 years ago, on June 17, 2002, the exhibition Where are the Children? Healing the Legacy of the Residential Schools (WATC) was opened by Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, Governor General of Canada, at the National Archives of Canada in Ottawa. Today, the WATC exhibition lives on as part of the Residential Schools Land Memory Atlas (RSLMA) launched by Carleton University’s Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre.

The RSLMA maps the location of Residential Schools across Canada, but additionally provides related information and includes the perspectives of the Survivors who lived through the experience. The series of maps in this atlas use location as a starting point to house images, videos, narratives and a variety of content relating to the devastating impacts of the individual Residential Schools, including the historical geography of the sites and buildings. The atlas incorporates associated materials, including media content and related information on Residential School reunions and gatherings, other exhibitions about Residential Schools, and sketch maps of Survivor accounts, created by university students. which build upon their understanding of Survivor testimonies.

“The Legacy of Hope Foundation is celebrating our 20th anniversary this year, so the launch of the RSLMA serves as a tangible reminder that our work continues to be referenced and developed and that there is still more work to do. We are proud to be a partner and proud that the first exhibition that we produced provided the inspiration for this project and that we are continuing to educate Canadians about Indigenous history,” said Teresa Edwards, Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel at the Legacy of Hope Foundation.

The atlas is the culmination of five years of research supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). The project involves Indigenous partners, including the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, the Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association, the Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group, the Legacy of Hope Foundation and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. The Atlas received significant contributions by Jeff Thomas, other academic partners, including Algoma and Concordia University and University of Manitoba.

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a charitable organization that has been working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing impacts of the Residential School System, Sixties Scoop, Day Schools, and other colonial acts of oppression against Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants and their communities. LHF works to address racism and to promote healing among everyone in Canada. The LHF encourages people to address discrimination and injustices and to contribute to the equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples in order to foster Reconciliation.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

PRESS RELEASE – 12-year Anniversary of the Federal Government’s Apology to Residential School Survivors

June 11, 2020 (Ottawa, ON) – It was 12 years ago today, June 11, 2008, when then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper stood in the House of Commons and delivered a formal Apology on behalf of the Government of Canada and all Canadians, to students of the Residential School System in Canada. This carefully-worded Apology was a requirement of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (IRSSA), and was a first step toward Reconciliation – but, as a country, we still have much work to do. The Government has yet to uphold many of the commitments set out in the IRSSA, and is far from fulfilling the 94 Calls to Action that were subsequently recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Apology served as a broadcast, bringing the Residential School System and all of its horrors to the forefront of the Nation’s attention for the first time in history. While the very existence of these schools was an aspect of history largely unbeknownst to many Canadians, it was the Apology that finally brought to light an admission of the harms caused to generations of Indigenous families from harmful Government policies, colonial acts of oppression, and the treatment of Indigenous Peoples.

On the occasion of this 12-year anniversary of the release of the Apology, LHF Executive Director and In-house Legal Counsel, Teresa Edwards reiterates that, “An apology is only meaningful if it is followed by actions that echo its words. Twelve years later, the Apology has been followed with many more words, but very little action. Now more than ever the Government of Canada must work with Indigenous Peoples to address the racism and the many injustices that continue to exist for Indigenous Peoples. It starts with education and relationship-building. Today Canadians can ask themselves what they can do to improve the situation, then do it. We all need to work together toward Reconciliation.”

The Residential School System not only failed to deliver education to generations of Indigenous children, it supported generations of abuse, neglect and cultural disruption. The LHF encourages all Canadians to act now to address the ongoing discrimination and injustices against Indigenous Peoples and to improve the relationship with Indigenous Peoples.

The LHF is an Indigenous-led charitable Foundation whose mandate is to educate Canadians by raising awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, Sixties Scoop and other colonial act of oppression against Indigenous Peoples. It does this through the ongoing development and implementation of Curricula and Educational Resources that uncover the true history of Indigenous colonial experience in Canada in order to build understanding, empathy and respectful relationship with Canadians. The LHF has over twenty exhibitions about the history of Indigenous Peoples and the injustices they faced, to encourage Canadians to act and to improve the situation, and to support the ongoing healing process of Residential School Survivors. LHF is celebrating its 20-year Anniversary of educating Canadians in order to foster Reconciliation in Canada today.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

The Legacy of Hope Foundation with KAIROS Releases – Building Understanding and Action for Reconciliation – Ravens: Messengers of Change

(Ottawa, ON) June 2, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF), in partnership with KAIROS, is pleased to announce the release of Ravens: Messengers of Change a resource designed to create awareness and action for Reconciliation in Canada. This resource includes an activity, called ‘Building a Tree of Reconciliation’ which works by engaging groups with information and concepts about Indigenous Peoples and then applying this information to create new understandings that empower people to take informed action for Reconciliation. The activity can be used with participants as young as elementary students up to, and including, adults. It can be a tool for the classrooms in school settings, community groups, offices, and with anyone who shares a desire to learn more and pursue thoughtful action towards achieving Reconciliation.

This Activity grew out of a need to build on the KAIROS Blanket Exercise. The Blanket Exercise is an experiential exercise in learning about Indigenous histories, experiences with colonization acts of oppression, as well as Indigenous resilience and strength in overcoming and being able to maintain and/or reclaim their identities, cultures, language and knowledge despite the genocide. Typically, participants in the Blanket Exercise are powerfully moved by the learning experience. Teresa Edwards, Executive Director and In-House Counsel at the LHF said, “Completing this Activity takes participants up to the present day and emphasizes the need for informed action for Reconciliation. ‘Building a Tree of Reconciliation,’ was developed to help participants take responsibility for their learning and desire to improve the current situation.”

Participants in the ‘Building a Tree of Reconciliation’ Activity will learn more about Indigenous philosophies and about living a life of balance and harmony. They will be introduced to a framework of action or commitment one can take based on Indigenous realities, and based on their knowledge and comfort levels. Concrete examples are provided drawn from the TRC 94 Calls to Action to help foster action that can lead to positive change in Canada.

If people have not completed the KAIROS Blanket Exercise previously, this Activity can still be used as a standalone along with many of LHF’s tools. Facilitators will find helpful information, appendix resources, curriculum and ideas that can be adapted to participants of varying ages and knowledge levels. For more information or a copy of this Activity, please see legacyofhope.ca/education and www.kairosblanketexercise.org/

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System, Sixties Scoop, and Day Schools on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities in order to support their healing and to foster Reconciliation in Canada. For more information on the LHF and its exhibitions, research reports, curricula, including resources for educators, visit the Legacy of Hope Foundation website at www.legacyofhope.ca

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation hosting Winnipeg Regional Sessions for the Waniskahtan Project on Missing, Murdered, Indigenous Women, and 2SLGBTQ+

(Ottawa, ON) May 7, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is pleased to announce that it has held its sixth and seventh final regional group session for the Waniskahtan Project, which was held through two online virtual sessions, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The first sessions took place on Tuesday, May 5, 2020 the day that has been chosen as the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, which began in the United States but now the day is also observed in many places in Canada.

Our second session was held all afternoon on Thursday, May 7, 2020, and will consist of participants from the Winnipeg region. The project seeks to honour the lives and legacies of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals, to stop the instances of violence and to promote peace.

The goal of these sessions was to gather feedback from families across Canada who have lost loved ones through violence and to help us create an exhibition that will educate the public on the racism, sexism and violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals. “It is unfortunate that we will not be traveling directly to Indigenous communities to meet face-to-face, but we are grateful to still be able to talk with families affected by missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals by having these virtual sessions, and by having them share their views about the development of the exhibition, to raise awareness of the discrimination and marginalization experienced, and to identify solutions to address these issues,” stated LHF Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel, Teresa Edwards.

Individuals who are not able to make it to the sessions can still participate by getting us their feedback by filling out the “Ways to Participate Form” that can be found directly on our website at

Waniskahtan

The end product will result in a travelling exhibition, Waniskahtan and accompanying Activity Guide on MMIWG and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals to honour the lives lost, increase awareness of the issues that put them at risk, address male violence, and promote actions to protect everyone. This includes encouraging exhibition viewers to make a personal commitment to stand up against violence and promote peace. Waniskahtan, is Swampy Cree and means “wake up.” Once completed, this exhibition will be added to the 19 LHF exhibitions that circulate across Canada to continue to educate and inspire positive action.

The LHF is a national Indigenous charitable organization whose purposes are to educate, raise awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, the Sixties Scoop, Day Schools and the intergenerational harms caused to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis by colonial acts of oppression. LHF aims to support the ongoing healing process of Survivors and their families and to work with Canadians to address racism and discrimination in order to address injustices and to promote equality for all and to foster Reconciliation.

For more information on the Legacy of Hope Foundation, please visit legacyofhope.ca.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

COVID-19 Update – Business Continuity

(Ottawa, ON) April 2, 2020 At the Legacy of Hope Foundation, we were looking forward to the year 2020 as this is the year that we celebrate our 20th Anniversary. While the COVID -19 pandemic has presented us all with unprecedented challenges, it is in our nature to look for hope in difficult times and it is in this spirit that we are continuing to work towards marking this important milestone in our existence.

As we face uncertainty, we believe that it is important to celebrate our successes. Since our incorporation on July 17, 2000, we have worked with Survivors and ally partners to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System and subsequent Sixties Scoop on First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada.

We are continuing to produce high quality exhibitions, curricula, and other resources from our homes while teleworking, so that we can continue support people to in their actions to address discrimination and injustices contributing to the equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of all, including Indigenous Peoples.

We have implemented our business continuity plan and we are committed to maintaining organizational operations throughout this period of heightened risk and uncertainty. We will continue to work on projects, issue progress reports, and try to accomplish deliverables in keeping with current agreements to the best of our ability. 

It is a privilege to work with our partners and communities and on behalf of our Board and our Staff, we thank you for your ongoing support, we urge you to be safe, and we look forward to our continued progress together over the next twenty years.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation to host the Kahnawake Regional Session for the Wanishkahtan Project

(Ottawa, ON) February 10, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is pleased to announce the fourth regional group session for the Waniskahtan Project, which will be held in Kahnawake, Quebec on Saturday, February 22, 2020. The project seeks to honour the lives and legacies of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals.

The goal of these sessions is to gather feedback from families across Canada who have lost loved ones through violence and to help us create the best exhibition we can, in order to educate the public on the racism, sexism and violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals. “By traveling directly to Indigenous communities, we are giving a chance to families affected by missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals to have a voice and to share their opinion about the development of the exhibition, to raise awareness of the discrimination and marginalization that Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals experience, and to identify solutions to address it,” stated LHF Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel, Teresa Edwards.

Individuals who are not able to make it to the sessions can participate by filling out the “Ways to Participate Form” that can be found directly on our website at legacyofhope.ca/project/waniskahtan/.

The end product will result in a travelling exhibition, Waniskahtan and accompanying Activity Guide on MMIWG and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals to honour their lives lost, increase awareness of the issues that put them at risk, address male violence, and promote actions to protect everyone. This includes encouraging exhibition viewers to make a personal commitment to stand up against violence and promote peace. Waniskahtan, is Swampy Cree and means “wake up.” Once completed, this exhibition will be added to the 19 LHF exhibitions that circulate across Canada.

The LHF is a national Indigenous charitable organization whose purposes are to educate, raise awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, including the Sixties Scoop and the intergenerational harms caused to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. LHF aims to support the ongoing healing process of Survivors and their families and to work with Canadians to take action to address racism and discrimination in order to promote equality and to foster Reconciliation.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation – Begins the Thunder Bay Regional Session for the Wanishkahtan Project

(Ottawa, ON) January 29, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is pleased to announce the third regional group session for the Waniskahtan Project, which will be held in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The project seeks to honour the lives and legacies of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals.

The goal of these sessions is to gather feedback from families across Canada who have lost loved ones through violence and to help us create the best exhibition we can, in order to educate the public on the racism, sexism and violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals. “By traveling directly to Indigenous communities, we are giving a chance to families affected by missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals to have a voice and to share their opinion about the development of the exhibition, to raise awareness of the discrimination and marginalization that Indigenous women and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals experience, and to identify solutions to address it,” stated LHF Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel, Teresa Edwards.

Individuals who are not able to make it to the sessions can participate by filling out the “Ways to Participate Form” that can be found directly on our website at legacyofhope.ca.

The end product will result in a travelling exhibition, Waniskahtan and accompanying Activity Guide on MMIWG and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals to honour their lives lost, increase awareness of the issues that put them at risk, address male violence, and promote actions to protect everyone. This includes encouraging exhibition viewers to make a personal commitment to stand up against violence and promote peace. Waniskahtan, is Swampy Cree and means “wake up.” Once completed, this exhibition will be added to the 19 LHF exhibitions that circulate across Canada,

The LHF is a national Indigenous charitable organization whose purposes are to educate, raise awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, including the Sixties Scoop and the intergenerational harms caused to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. LHF aims to support the ongoing healing process of Survivors and their families and to work with Canadians to take action to address racism and discrimination in order to promote equality and to foster Reconciliation.

For more information on the Legacy of Hope Foundation, visit legacyofhope.ca/news.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation publishes its new Hope and Healing Resource

(Ottawa, ON) January 22, 2020 – Just in time for its 20th anniversary, the Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) has published a new version of one of our most sought-after resources, Hope and Healing: The Impact of the Residential School System on Indigenous Peoples. This resource includes a brief history of the Residential School System (RSS), an explanation as to why learning about the RSS is important for all Canadians, what people can do to take action, and a timeline of events pertinent to the RSS for anyone in Canada who is interested in learning or teaching people about the topic.

The LHF has become a trusted source of information for Canadians, of healing for Survivors and communities, and a significant contributor to the process of Reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples. Over the last twenty years, the Foundation has become a leader in developing and delivering innovative, unique, and effective educational programming on the long-lasting impacts of the Residential Schools on Survivors, their families, and their communities. These resources, including Hope and Healing, have been accessed by hundreds of thousands of Canadians, and now the LHF has made it even better!

“We believe that by helping Canadians to understand the impacts of the Residential School System, we are laying the groundwork for Reconciliation,” said Teresa Edwards, Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel for the LHF. “We are dedicated to making heart-warming connections between all Canadians and Indigenous Peoples and outlining why this issue should matter to them and how they can take action to improve the situation currently facing Indigenous Peoples. We offer positive suggestions to address discrimination in Canada and how everyone can all be a part of the solution.”

The LHF is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System and subsequent Sixties Scoop on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing. The LHF works to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples and to foster Reconciliation. To request a copy, or for more information about the LHF visit the Legacy of Hope Foundation website at www.legacyofhope.ca. To download Hope and Healing click here

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation Launches Indigenous Oral Testimonies Activity Guide to accompany Oral Testimonies

(Ottawa, ON) January 20, 2020 – Ever since the Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) was founded in the year 2000 we have been working to educate Canadians about the Residential School System, its history, and ongoing impacts. Between 2006 and 2009, the LHF gathered the testimonies of over 600 Residential School Survivors from across the country. Our newest resource, the Let the Truth Be Told: Indigenous Oral Testimonies Activity Guide was developed so that those witnessing the Survivors’ Testimonies will have a richer experience where participants can be fully engaged and a part of the Reconciliation process.

Let The Truth Be Told will give teachers and students, and any adults willing to learn, the resources they need to examine the history of the Residential School System and to recognize the impact it has had and continues to have, on generations of Indigenous Peoples in Canada. Another goal of this Guide is the exploration of Reconciliation and its foundations for understanding and meaningful action. Through these lessons, participants will work towards their own improved understanding of what it means for Indigenous and non-Indigenous People to work towards Reconciliation.

Using Oral Testimonies is a way of bringing Indigenous voices directly to participants which is what the Survivors who shared them had intended. This is putting Indigenous voices at the center of the learning experience and the process of using their Testimony shows recognition of the value of Indigenous voices and Oral Practices. Listening to Survivors speak about their experiences activates understanding, fosters empathy, and builds healthy caring that a textbook article or chapter could not achieve on its own.

The LHF is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System (RSS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing. The LHF works to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples and to foster Reconciliation. To purchase a copy, or for more information about the LHF visit the Legacy of Hope Foundation website at www.legacyofhope.ca

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Press Release – Listen, Hear Our Voices Funding Announcement

(OTTAWA, ON) January 15, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) has just received funding from Library and Archives Canada (LAC), to support the digitization and preservation project – Listen, Hear Our Voices. This project will allow us to convert into high-quality digital format, the collection of video testimonies of Residential School Survivors, of which we are stewards. This project will ensure that these Survivor stories and experiences are preserved in an oral story-telling format for future generations.

Since our organization began in 2000, the LHF’s collection of digital resources has always been at the heart of the organization. This unique library of audio and video Oral Testimonies by Residential School Survivors was gathered before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was mandated by the Canadian Government to do a similar process. The LHF « pre-TRC » testimonies continue to guide our work in educating and raising awareness about the intergenerational impacts of Residential Schools and the ongoing injustices Indigenous Peoples continue to face so that we can foster empathy, understanding, and inspire positive action in improving the issues facing Indigenous in Canada.

“We are excited that the Listen, Hear Our Voices project will once again allow us to work with Library and Archives Canada as they were our original partners in developing our first exhibition, Where are the Children? Healing the Legacy of the Residential Schools in 2002,” said Teresa Edwards, Executive Director and In-House Counsel. “I feel as though this brings us full-circle back to a positive and collaborative partnership that will result in the preservation of our Oral Traditions and history.”

This project is not only important to our organization but to all Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities across Canada, as these unique testimonies are an important part of the Reconciliation process. To celebrate the preservation of, and to welcome some of these new stories into the digital world, we will be holding an Elder-led ceremony at the Residential School History and Dialogue Centre in British Columbia and also in Ottawa, Ontario.

The LHF will continue to protect these testimonies so that this generation, and the next, can remember what happened, honour, understand, and ensure these things never happen again. As we continue to do this work, we know that it is the voices of the Survivors who will lead the way to mobilize Canadians to work towards ending discrimination and racism directed towards Indigenous Peoples.

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization that has been working to promote healing and Reconciliation in Canada for 20 years. The LHF’s goal is to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System (RSS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing. The LHF works to encourage people to address discrimination and injustices in order to contribute to the
equality, dignity, and respectful treatment of Indigenous Peoples and to foster Reconciliation.

For more information on the LHF and its exhibitions, including resources for educators, visit the Legacy of Hope Foundation website at www.legacyofhope.ca

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Legacy of Hope Foundation – Begins Regional Sessions for Wanishkahtan Project in Ottawa

(Ottawa, ON) January 10, 2020 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is pleased to announce the beginning of the regional group sessions for the Waniskahtan Project. The project seeks to honour the lives and legacies of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals.

There will be a total of five regional sessions during the next four months including the East Coast, Quebec and Nunavut, Ontario, the Prairies, the West Coast, and one national session for 2SLGBTQ+ individuals in Ottawa. “The goal of these sessions will be to gather feedback from families across Canada who have lost loved ones through violence and to help us create the best exhibition we can, in order to educate the public on the racism, sexism and violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals. We need to inspire action that will end violence,” said LHF Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel, Teresa Edwards.

Individuals who are not able to make it to the sessions can still participate by filling up our “Ways to Participate” Form that can be found directly on our website at www.legacyofhope.ca.

The travelling exhibition, Waniskahtan and accompanying Activity Guide on MMIWG and 2SLGBTQ+ individuals will honour lives lost, increase awareness of the issues that put them at risk, address male violence, and promote actions to protect everyone. This includes encouraging exhibition viewers to make a personal commitment to stand up against violence and promote peace. Waniskahtan, is Swampy Cree and means “wake up.” Once completed, this exhibition will be added to the 19 (nineteen) LHF exhibitions that circulate across Canada, and which can be borrowed by hosts for free.

The LHF is a national Indigenous charitable organization whose purposes are to educate, raise awareness and understanding of the impacts of Residential Schools, including the Sixties Scoop and the intergenerational harms caused to First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. LHF aims to support the ongoing healing process of Survivors and their families and to work with Canadians to take action to address racism and discrimination in order to promote equality and to foster Reconciliation.

For more information on the Legacy of Hope Foundation, visit legacyofhope.ca.

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

(OTTAWA, ON) October 21, 2019 – The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) gratefully acknowledges the contributions of The Home Depot Canada Foundation, Odawa Native Friendship Centre, Ladedo Visual Concepts, Algonquin Landscaping and Property Maintenance, and three Indigenous youth for the successful completion of our Bi-Giwen exhibition crates.

This project brought together community organizations, businesses, and Indigenous youth to build custom exhibition storage and shipping crates for the Bi-Giwen: Coming Home, Truth Telling from The Sixties Scoop exhibition. This exhibition shares the experiences of 12 Survivors of the Sixties Scoop from a first-hand perspective to educate Canadians about Indigenous history.   

“So much can be said about this truly unique community project. I am thankful for the multiple contributors and the expertise they shared with the Indigenous youth. The completion of customized crates will allow this exhibition to travel to venues across Canada without fear of damage,” said Teresa Edwards, Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel for the LHF, adding that, “when multiple people come together for projects like this, something special happens. We have not only built crates, but we have built partnerships, grown community spirit, and we have fostered skills in our youth with this incredibly successful project.”

The project was made possible through the Home Depot Canada Foundation Community Programs Grant. LHF matched the funds and the money was used to purchase building supplies and materials and to pay the Indigenous youth. The Odawa Indigenous Friendship Centre provided their wood-working workshop, which allowed the crates to be built in a safe and professional work space.  Rip Jones, volunteered his time, expertise on exhibition crate designing to the project, as well as provided instruction and guidance to the Indigenous youth who made the crates. Tim Baptiste, helped build, supervise and train the Indigenous youth in basic carpentry skills and crate construction, and provided his own staff to help complete the eight large crates.

A special thank you to all of you for your amazing contributions in making this project a reality. We could not have done it without you!

  • The Home Depot Foundation, Community Programs Grant
  • Morgan Hare, Executive Director, Odawa Native Friendship Centre
  • Rip Jones, Ladedo Visual Concepts for the design of the crates
  • Indigenous Youth: Derek Edwards-Barber, Thomas Moses and Nathan Coté-Spence who were trained in basic carpentry and custom crate building
  • Tim Baptiste, Algonquin Landscaping and Property Maintenance for the many volunteer hours spent supervising, training the Indigenous youth, building, allowing your staff to help and for ensuring professional quality outcomes for this project

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD.
Executive Director and In-House Legal Counsel
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Phone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

Escaping Residential Schools – Advisory Committee: Call for Participants

The Legacy of Hope Foundation is a national Indigenous-led, charitable organization founded of the Residential School System. This includes teaching people about the direct and ongoing impacts on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Survivors, their families and their communities to make known the histories of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, including the histories of injustice.

The reality is, “more than 3,200 kids died inside those hellish institutions, and hundreds of the dead remain unidentified, their names never properly recorded. The true circumstances around how and why these kids died may never be fully known or understood.” – Truth and Reconciliation Commission, “Missing Children and Unmarked Burials” research project.

The “Escaping Indian Residential Schools” project will build on this era of reconciliation between Indigenous peoples and Canada through an educational and awareness exhibition of the Residential School experience of Indigenous (First Nation, Inuit, and Métis) students who sought to escape the system by giving voice to those who died and voice to those who survived the process. The primary goal of this project is to develop an exhibition and educational materials on the issues of missing children and unmarked burials, and also to honour the memories of those children who sought to escape the system by sharing their stories.

The project will take place from April 1, 2019 to March 31, 2020 and will be guided by a six- person volunteer Advisory Committee comprised of Indigenous Survivors or Intergenerational Survivors of the Residential School System and one Elder.

If you are interested in participating in this project’s volunteer Advisory Committee, we invite you to submit the attached application by email at reception@legacyofhope.ca by Friday, August 30, 2019 with the subject line “ATTENTION: Manager of Exhibitions and Curatorial Projects”. Click here to download the application

Application deadline closes at 4:00 p.m. EDT on Friday, August 30, 2019.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Who Can Apply: Preference will be given to persons with Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Metis) ancestry (24(1) (a) of OHRC) who are qualified candidates.   

Job Posting – WANISKAHTAN Project Coordinator, Legacy of Hope Foundation

Job Type: Part-time, Term Position – (1 year and 7 months)
Term: August 12, 2019 – March 31, 2021

Required education: Post-Secondary Diploma/Certificate (or equivalent experience)
Salary: $23,000 per year

Closing Date: July 19, 2019

The Legacy of Hope Foundation is a national Indigenous-led, charitable organization founded in 2000 with the goal of educating and raising awareness about the history and many impacts of the Residential School System. This includes teaching people about the direct and ongoing impacts on First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Survivors, their families and their communities to make known the histories of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, including the histories of injustice.

Our mission is to build understanding and empathy and to inspire self-reflection and personal commitments to take action that will create respectful and equal relationships aimed at healing and fostering Reconciliation. LHF highlights the rich cultures, resilience and strength and many contributions of Indigenous Peoples in Canada.

LHF works in partnership with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Peoples, communities, and organizations, and with governmental agencies, foundations, educational institutions, and others across the country to develop educational materials, commemoration projects, and research initiatives that support our mission.

The Legacy of Hope Foundation’s vision for Canada is that informed, capable, and respectful people live as equals in a mutually beneficial, caring, dignified, and just relationship of Reconciliation, for a brighter future of all.

Position Overview: As part of the Legacy of Hope team, and the primary staff member for the development of a new exhibition and Activity Guide, the Waniskahtan Project Coordinator for the Legacy of Hope will work directly with the Manager of Exhibitions and Curatorial Projects, the Executive Director and Indigenous communities and Partnering Organizations to develop and coordinate all aspects of exhibition and curatorial projects. This role requires detail-oriented execution, flexibility, initiative, and a very strong collaborative approach, particularly with our Indigenous partners. The position is for a 19-month term and will be located on-site in Ottawa.

General duties

  • Write reports, draft exhibition and project content in collaboration with partners, briefing notes, PowerPoint presentations and/or other related documents;
  • Write individual and group proposals to secure project funds for LHF;
  • Network with the Indigenous/Art community, graphic designers; and,
  • Other related duties, as required from time to time.

Specific Job Duties:

  • Collaborating with the Legacy of Hope’s Executive Director and Indigenous partners to develop project initiatives and goals relating to LHF’s mission and mandate.
  • Monitoring project progress, supervising the accounting for travelling exhibits and communicating regularly with the Legacy of Hope’s Executive Director and all project stakeholders, as directed.
  • Managing the Legacy of Hope’s public image and ensuring that all project records (paperwork, documentation, promotional materials, etc.) are organized and well maintained.
  • Networking and outreach with artists, curators, and arts organizations in throughout Canada to develop, promote and facilitate project activities.
  • Communicating with project participants to ensure they have the support and resources needed.
  • Researching funding sources and preparing funding applications to strengthen each project’s budget and seeking funding to support new and emerging projects.
  • Researching and pursuing sponsorship opportunities for the project, as needed.
  • Coordinating travel, accommodations, venues, etc. for project events, as needed.
  • Enhancing the Legacy of Hope’s profile through communication, dissemination, and outreach.
  • Strengthening communications and relationships with artists, curators, project partners, and Indigenous communities throughout Canada.
  • Participating in the hiring with the ED and the management of any secondary staff required for projects, as needed.

Qualifications & Skills:

  • College Diploma or University Degree (or equivalent experience) in the Arts, Administration, Curatorial Studies, Project Management, Indigenous Studies, or any related field with a minimum of two years of arts-related work experience.
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office tools (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.), as well as current social media and web-based platforms.
  • Proven ability to coordinate multiple demands and requests in a fast-paced, highly professional environment, work comfortably with change, and problem solve.
  • Proven time management skills and a strong attention to detail and accountability.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work independently with minimal supervision.
  • Excellent communication skills (verbal and written) with the ability to work as a team member.
  • Must have in depth knowledge and understanding of Indigenous issues related to Residential Schools and the ongoing impacts on Survivors and their families;
  • Strong writing skills with the ability to carry out culturally-relevant analysis in all deliverables;
  • Ability to carry out research, and write in both plain language and academic styles;
  • Ability to apply sound judgment;
  • Familiarity with Indigenous practices, and knowledge of cultural protocols, including of interactions with Elders;
  • Good understanding and knowledge of key social justice issues impacting Indigenous Peoples;
  • Commitment to, and knowledge of the principles, values, mission and mandate of the Legacy of Hope Foundation;
  • Good understanding of policy, program and legislation, (including violence prevention and impacts, health, housing, etc.) affecting Indigenous Peoples;
  • The ability to communicate in Indigenous languages are an asset;
  •  The ability to communicate in both official languages are an asset (French and English);
  • Knowledge of contemporary Indigenous arts practices, Indigenous artists and communities;
  • Driver’s License is essential to be able to meet often with partners, etc. (funds for gas/kilometers will be provided);
  • Some travel across Canada may be required; and
  • Overtime may be required from time-to-time.

All interested applicants must submit an electronic cover letter and résumé to the Legacy of Hope Foundation by email at Reception@legacyofhope.ca by July 19, 2019 with the subject line “ATTENTION: Manager of Exhibitions and Curatorial Projects.” Please demonstrate how you meet the requirements of the position within your documents, and ensure they are formatted as .doc or .pdf files.

The successful candidate must be legally entitled to work in Canada, and the offer of employment is conditional upon receipt of a Criminal Records Search, Vulnerable Sector Screening. We thank all who apply, however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

L’Université Carleton lance le Residential Schools Land Memory Atlas à l’occasion de la Journée nationale des peuples autochtones

Ottawa, 21 juin 2020 – Il y a plus de 18 ans, le 17 juin 2002, l’exposition Que sont les enfants devenus ? Guérir l’héritage des pensionnats (QSED) a été inaugurée par Son Excellence la très honorable Adrienne Clarkson, Gouverneure générale du Canada, aux Archives nationales du Canada à Ottawa. Aujourd’hui, l’exposition WATC se poursuit dans le cadre du Residential Schools Land Memory Atlas (RSLMA) lancé par le Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre de l’Université Carleton.

Le RSLMA cartographie l’emplacement des pensionnats indiens à travers le Canada, transmet des informations connexes et communique le point de vue des Survivant(e)s qui ont vécu cette expérience. La série de cartes de cet atlas utilise l’emplacement comme point de départ pour héberger des images, des vidéos, des récits et une variété de contenus relatifs aux impacts dévastateurs des différents pensionnats indiens, y compris la géographie historique des sites et des bâtiments. L’atlas intègre des documents connexes, notamment des contenus médiatiques et des informations sur les réunions et les rassemblements des pensionnats indiens, d’autres expositions sur les pensionnats et des croquis de cartes de récits de Survivant(e)s, créés par des étudiants universitaires, qui s’appuient sur leur compréhension des témoignages de Survivant(e)s.

« La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir célèbre son 20e anniversaire cette année. Le lancement de la RSLMA nous rappelle donc, de manière tangible, que notre travail continue de faire son chemin et poursuit son développement, mais nous rappelle également qu’il reste encore du travail à faire. Nous sommes fiers d’être un partenaire et fiers que la première exposition que nous avons produite ait inspiré ce projet et puisse continuer à sensibiliser les Canadiens à l’histoire autochtone, » a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir. »

L’atlas est l’aboutissement de cinq années de recherches soutenues par le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines (CRSH). Le projet implique des partenaires autochtones, notamment le Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre, la Children of Shingwauk Alumni Association, le Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group, la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir et le Centre national pour la vérité et la réconciliation. L’Atlas a bénéficié de contributions importantes de Jeff Thomas et d’autres partenaires universitaires, notamment Alogom, l’Université Concordia et l’Université du Manitoba.

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est un organisme caritatif qui travaille depuis 20 ans à promouvoir la guérison et la Réconciliation au Canada. L’objectif de la FAE est d’informer et de sensibiliser la population à l’histoire et aux conséquences actuelles du régime des pensionnats indiens, de la Rafle des années 60, des écoles de jour et d’autres actes d’oppression coloniale perpétrés contre les Survivant(e)s autochtones (Premières nations, Inuits et Métis), leurs descendants et leurs communautés. La FAE travaille à lutter contre le racisme et à promouvoir la guérison de tous au Canada. La FAE encourage les gens à s’élever contre la discrimination et les injustices et à contribuer à l’égalité, à la dignité et au traitement respectueux des peuples autochtones afin de favoriser la Réconciliation.   

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir organise des consultations régionales à Winnipeg pour le projet Waniskahtan sur les femmes et 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones disparues et assassinées

(Ottawa, ON) 7 mai 2020 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est heureuse d’annoncer qu’elle a tenu ses sixième et septième dernières sessions de groupe régional pour le projet Waniskahtan, qui se sont déroulées par le biais de deux sessions virtuelles en ligne, en raison de la pandémie de la COVID-19 en cours. Les premières sessions ont eu lieu le mardi 5 mai 2020, le jour qui a été choisi comme Journée nationale de sensibilisation aux femmes et filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, qui a débuté aux États-Unis, mais qui est maintenant également observée dans de nombreux endroits au Canada.

Notre deuxième session a eu lieu tout l’après-midi du jeudi 7 mai 2020 et fut composée de participants de la région de Winnipeg. Le projet vise à honorer la vie et l’héritage des femmes, filles (FADA) et personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones, à mettre fin aux actes de violence et à promouvoir la paix.

L’objectif de ces sessions était de recueillir les réactions des familles à travers le Canada qui ont perdu un être cher à cause de la violence et de nous aider à créer une exposition qui éduquera le public sur le racisme, le sexisme et la violence contre les femmes, les filles et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones. « Il est regrettable que nous ne nous rendions pas directement dans les communautés autochtones pour les rencontrer en personne, mais nous sommes reconnaissants de pouvoir continuer à parler avec les familles touchées par la disparition et le meurtre de femmes, de jeunes filles et de personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones en organisant ces sessions virtuelles et en leur permettant de partager leurs points de vue sur le développement de l’exposition, de sensibiliser les gens à la discrimination et à la marginalisation qu’ils subissent et d’identifier des solutions pour résoudre ces problèmes », a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne de la Fondation autochtone l’espoir.

Les personnes qui ne sont pas en mesure de se rendre aux sessions peuvent néanmoins participer en nous faisant part de leurs commentaires en remplissant le « Formulaire de participation » qui se trouve directement sur notre site web au http://fondationautochtonedelespoir.ca/project/waniskahtan/

Le produit final donnera lieu à une exposition itinérante, Waniskahtan, et au guide d’activités qui l’accompagne sur FADA et personnes 2SLGBTQ+, afin d’honorer les vies perdues, de sensibiliser aux problèmes qui les mettent en danger, de traiter la violence masculine et de promouvoir des actions visant à protéger tout le monde. Il s’agit notamment d’encourager les spectateurs de l’exposition à s’engager personnellement à se dresser contre la violence et à promouvoir la paix. Waniskahtan, en cri swampy, signifie « réveille-toi ». Une fois achevée, cette exposition sera ajoutée aux 19 expositions de la FAE qui circulent dans tout le Canada pour continuer à éduquer et à inspirer des actions positives.

La FAE est une organisation nationale autochtone caritative dont le but est d’éduquer et de sensibiliser la population aux impacts du Régime des pensionnats indiens, des écoles de jour et de la Rafle des années 60, ainsi qu’aux torts intergénérationnels causés aux peuples des Premières nations, Inuits et Métis par des actes coloniaux d’oppression. Notre mission est de favoriser le processus de guérison continu des Survivants, des Survivantes et leurs familles, tout en travaillant de concert avec les Canadiens pour éradiquer le racisme et la discrimination, dans le but ultime de promouvoir l’égalité et de favoriser la Réconciliation. 

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

Mise à jour sur la COVID-19 – Continuité des activités

(Ottawa, ON) 2 avril 2020 À la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir, nous attendions avec impatience l’année 2020, car c’est l’année où nous célébrons notre 20e anniversaire. Bien que la pandémie de la COVID-19 nous ait tous confrontés à des défis sans précédent, il est dans notre nature de rechercher l’espoir dans les moments difficiles et c’est dans cet esprit que nous continuons à travailler pour marquer cette étape importante de notre existence.


Face à l’incertitude, nous pensons qu’il est important de célébrer nos succès. Depuis notre incorporation le 17 juillet 2000, nous avons travaillé avec des survivants et des partenaires pour éduquer et sensibiliser la population à l’histoire et les impacts intergénérationnels actuels du régime des pensionnats indiens et de la rafle des années 60 sur les survivants des Premières nations, des Inuits et des Métis, leurs descendants et leurs communautés, le tout dans le but de promouvoir la guérison et la réconciliation au Canada.


Nous continuons à produire des expositions, des programmes et d’autres ressources de grande qualité à partir de nos domiciles tout en télétravaillant, afin de pouvoir continuer à soutenir les gens dans leurs actions pour lutter contre la discrimination et les injustices, contribuant ainsi à l’égalité, à la dignité et au traitement respectueux de tous, y compris des peuples autochtones.


Nous avons mis en œuvre notre plan de continuité des activités et nous nous engageons à maintenir les opérations de l’organisme tout au long de cette période de risque et d’incertitude accrus. Nous continuerons à travailler sur des projets, à publier des rapports d’avancement et à essayer d’accomplir au mieux nos tâches, conformément aux accords en vigueur.
C’est un privilège de travailler avec nos partenaires et nos communautés et, au nom de notre conseil d’administration et de notre personnel, nous vous remercions de votre soutien continu, nous vous prions d’être prudents et nous sommes impatients de continuer à avancer ensemble au cours des vingt prochaines années.

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation Autochtone de l’Espoir entreprend la séance régionale de Kahnawake, Quebec, pour le projet Wanishkahtan

(Ottawa, ON) February 11, 2020 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est heureuse d’annoncer le quatreime séance de groupe régionale en 22 de Fevrier, 2020, pour le projet Waniskahtan. Le projet vise à honorer la vie et l’héritage des femmes et des filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, ainsi que des personnes 2SLGBTQ+.

L’objectif de ces rencontres sera de recueillir les commentaires des familles canadiennes qui ont perdu des êtres chers à cause de la violence et de nous aider à créer la meilleure exposition possible dans le but de sensibiliser la population au racisme, au sexisme et à la violence contre les femmes, les filles et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones « En nous rendant directement dans les communautés autochtones, nous donnons la chance aux familles touchées par la disparition et le meurtre de femmes, de filles et de personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones de faire entendre leur voix et de partager leur opinion sur le développement de l’exposition, de sensibiliser à la discrimination et à la marginalisation que subissent les femmes et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones, et d’identifier des solutions pour y remédier », a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne de la FAE.

Les personnes qui ne peuvent être présentes lors des séances peuvent quand même participer en remplissant notre formulaire « Façons de participer » disponible sur notre site web au www.legacyofhope.ca.

Le produit final donnera lieu à une exposition itinérante, Waniskahtan, et au guide d’activités qui l’accompagne sur les FFADA et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+. Il servira à honorer les vies perdues, à sensibiliser les gens aux problèmes qui les mettent en danger, à s’attaquer à la violence masculine et à encourager les actions visant à protéger chaque être humain. Il s’agit notamment d’encourager les spectateurs de l’exposition à s’engager personnellement à se dresser contre la violence et à promouvoir la paix. Waniskahtan est un cri Swampy Cree qui signifie « réveillez-vous ». Une fois terminée, cette exposition sera ajoutée aux 19 (dix-neuf) expositions de la FAE qui circulent actuellement au Canada.

La FAE est une organisation nationale autochtone caritative dont le but est d’éduquer et de sensibiliser la population aux impacts du Système des pensionnats et de la Rafle des années 60, ainsi qu’aux torts intergénérationnels causés aux peuples des Premières nations, Inuits et Métis. Notre mission est de favoriser le processus de guérison continu des Survivants et leurs familles, tout en travaillant de concert avec les Canadiens pour éradiquer le racisme et la discrimination, dans le but ultime de promouvoir l’égalité et de favoriser la Réconciliation.

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir entreprend la séance régionale de Thunder Bay pour le projet Wanishkahtan

(Ottawa, ON) 29 janvier 2020 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est heureuse d’annoncer la troisième séance de groupe régionale pour le projet Waniskahtan. Le projet vise à honorer la vie et l’héritage des femmes et des filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, ainsi que des personnes 2SLGBTQ+.

L’objectif de ces rencontres sera de recueillir les commentaires des familles canadiennes qui ont perdu des êtres chers à cause de la violence et de nous aider à créer la meilleure exposition possible dans le but de sensibiliser la population au racisme, au sexisme et à la violence contre les femmes, les filles et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones « En nous rendant directement dans les communautés autochtones, nous donnons la chance aux familles touchées par la disparition et le meurtre de femmes, de filles et de personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones de faire entendre leur voix et de partager leur opinion sur le développement de l’exposition, de sensibiliser à la discrimination et à la marginalisation que subissent les femmes et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+ autochtones, et d’identifier des solutions pour y remédier », a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne de la FAE.

Les personnes qui ne peuvent être présentes lors des séances peuvent quand même participer en remplissant notre formulaire « Façons de participer » disponible sur notre site web au www.legacyofhope.ca.

Le produit final donnera lieu à une exposition itinérante, Waniskahtan, et au guide d’activités qui l’accompagne sur les FFADA et les personnes 2SLGBTQ+. Il servira à honorer les vies perdues, à sensibiliser les gens aux problèmes qui les mettent en danger, à s’attaquer à la violence masculine et à encourager les actions visant à protéger chaque être humain. Il s’agit notamment d’encourager les spectateurs de l’exposition à s’engager personnellement à se dresser contre la violence et à promouvoir la paix. Waniskahtan est un cri Swampy Cree qui signifie « réveillez-vous ». Une fois terminée, cette exposition sera ajoutée aux 19 (dix-neuf) expositions de la FAE qui circulent actuellement au Canada.

La FAE est une organisation nationale autochtone caritative dont le but est d’éduquer et de sensibiliser la population aux impacts du Système des pensionnats et de la Rafle des années 60, ainsi qu’aux torts intergénérationnels causés aux peuples des Premières nations, Inuits et Métis. Notre mission est de favoriser le processus de guérison continu des Survivants et leurs familles, tout en travaillant de concert avec les Canadiens pour éradiquer le racisme et la discrimination, dans le but ultime de promouvoir l’égalité et de favoriser la Réconciliation. 

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir lance un guide d’activités pour accompagner les témoignages oraux

(Ottawa, ON) 20 janvier 2020 – Depuis la création de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) en 2000, nous nous efforçons d’informer les Canadiens sur le système des pensionnats Indiens, son histoire et ses impacts continus. Entre 2006 et 2009, la Fondation a recueilli les témoignages de plus de 600 Survivants et Survivantes des pensionnats Indiens issus de partout au pays. Notre plus récente ressource, le Guide d’activités Parler de la Vérité: témoignages oraux d’autochtones, a été élaborée afin que les personnes qui assistent aux témoignages des Survivants et Survivantes puissent vivre une expérience plus enrichissante, s’engager pleinement et faire partie du processus de réconciliation.

Parler de la Vérité donnera aux enseignants et aux élèves, ainsi qu’à tout adulte désireux d’apprendre, les ressources dont ils ont besoin pour examiner l’histoire du système des pensionnats Indiens et pour reconnaître l’impact qu’il a eu et continue d’avoir sur des générations de peuples autochtones au Canada. Un autre objectif de ce guide est l’exploration de la Réconciliation et de ses fondements pour la compréhension et l’action significative. Grâce à ces leçons, les participants travailleront à améliorer leur propre compréhension de ce que cela signifie.

L’utilisation de témoignages oraux est une façon de faire entendre les voix autochtones directement aux participants, ce que désiraient les Survivants et Survivantes qui les ont partagés. Il s’agit de placer les voix autochtones au centre de l’expérience d’apprentissage et le processus d’utilisation de leur témoignage montre la reconnaissance de la valeur des voix et des pratiques orales autochtones. Le fait d’écouter les Survivants et Survivantes parler de leurs expériences active la compréhension, favorise l’empathie et développe une attention saine qu’un article ou un chapitre de manuel ne pourrait faire seul.

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est un organisme de bienfaisance national dirigé par des Autochtones qui travaille depuis 20 ans à promouvoir la guérison et la Réconciliation au Canada. L’objectif de la FAE est d’éduquer et de sensibiliser la population à l’histoire et aux impacts intergénérationnels du Système des pensionnats et de la Rafle des années 60 sur les Survivants et Survivantes autochtones (Premières nations, Inuits et Métis), leurs descendants et leurs communautés afin de favoriser la guérison. La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir travaille à encourager les gens à nommer la discrimination et les injustices afin de contribuer à l’égalité, à la dignité et au traitement respectueux des peuples autochtones et de favoriser la Réconciliation. Pour acheter une copie, ou pour plus d’information sur la FAE, visitez le site Web de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir au www.fondationautochtonedelespoir.ca

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

Communiqué de presse – Annonce de financement pour Écoutez, entendez nos voix

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FH) s’est récemment vu octroyer un financement de Bibliothèque et Archives Canada (BAC) visant à soutenir le projet de numérisation et de préservation Écoutez, entendez nos voix. Ce projet nous permettra de convertir, en format numérique de haute qualité, la collection de témoignages vidéo des Survivants et Survivantes des pensionnats Indiens dont nous sommes les intendants. Ce projet permettra de s’assurer que les récits et les expériences des Survivants et Survivantes sont préservés sous forme de récits oraux pour les générations futures.

Depuis les débuts de notre organisme en 2000, la collection de ressources numériques de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir a toujours été au cœur de l’organisation. Cette bibliothèque unique composée de témoignages oraux audio et vidéo de Survivants et Survivantes des pensionnats Indiens a été rassemblée avant que la Commission de vérité et réconciliation (CVR) ne soit mandatée par le gouvernement canadien pour effectuer un processus similaire. Les témoignages « pré-CVR » de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir continuent de guider notre travail d’éducation et de sensibilisation aux répercussions intergénérationnelles des pensionnats Indiens et aux injustices continues auxquelles les peuples autochtones continuent de faire face, afin que nous puissions favoriser l’empathie, la compréhension et inspirer une action positive pour améliorer les problèmes auxquels les autochtones du Canada sont confrontés.

« Nous sommes ravis que le projet Écoutez, entendez nos voix nous permette une fois de plus de travailler avec Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, qui ont été nos partenaires initiaux dans l’élaboration, en 2002, de notre première exposition, intitulée Où sont les enfants ? Guérir les séquelles des pensionnats Indiens », a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne. « J’ai l’impression que cela nous ramène à un partenariat positif et collaboratif qui permettra de préserver nos traditions orales et notre histoire. »

Ce projet est important non seulement pour notre organisme, mais aussi pour toutes les communautés autochtones et non autochtones du Canada, car ces témoignages uniques constituent une partie importante du processus de réconciliation. Pour célébrer la préservation de ces nouvelles histoires et pour accueillir certaines d’entre elles dans le monde numérique, nous tiendrons une cérémonie dirigée par des Aînés au Residential School History and Dialogue Centre en Colombie-Britannique et aussi à Ottawa, en Ontario.

La FAE continuera à protéger ces témoignages afin que cette génération et la suivante puissent se souvenir des événements qui se sont produits, honorer, comprendre et s’assurer qu’ils ne se reproduiront plus jamais. En poursuivant ce travail, nous savons que ce sont les voix des Survivants et Survivantes qui ouvriront la voie à la mobilisation des Canadiens pour mettre fin à la discrimination et au racisme à l’égard des peuples autochtones.

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est un organisme de bienfaisance national dirigé par des Autochtones qui travaille depuis 20 ans à promouvoir la guérison et la Réconciliation au Canada. L’objectif de la FAE est d’éduquer et de sensibiliser la population aux impacts du Système des pensionnats et de la Rafle des années 60, ainsi qu’aux torts intergénérationnels causés aux peuples des Premières nations, Inuits et Métis. Notre mission est de favoriser le processus de guérison continu des Survivants et de leurs familles, tout en travaillant de concert avec les Canadiens pour éradiquer le racisme et la discrimination, dans le but ultime de promouvoir l’égalité et de favoriser la Réconciliation.

Pour plus d’informations sur la FAE et ses expositions ou pour obtenir des ressources destinées aux éducateurs, visitez le site Web de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir au www.fondationautochtonedelespoir.ca

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir reconnaît avec gratitude les contributions de la communauté pour la construction des caisses de l’exposition Bi-Giwen

(OTTAWA, ON) 21 octobre 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) remercie chaleureusement la Fondation Home Depot Canada, le Centre d’amitié autochtone Odawa, Ladedo Visual Concepts, Algonquin Landscaping and Property Maintenance, ainsi que trois jeunes autochtones pour la construction réussie de nos caisses d’expédition pour Bi-Giwen.

Ce projet a rassemblé des organismes communautaires, des entreprises et de jeunes autochtones pour la construction de caisses d’entreposage et d’expédition sur mesure pour l’exposition Bi-Giwen : Rentrer à la maison – la vérité sur la Rafle des années 60. Cette exposition présente les expériences de 12 survivants de la Rafle des années 60 dans une perspective personnelle visant à éduquer les Canadiens sur l’histoire autochtone.   

« On peut en dire tant de choses sur ce projet communautaire vraiment unique. Je suis reconnaissante envers les multiples contributeurs et l’expertise qu’ils ont partagée avec les jeunes autochtones. La fabrication des caisses personnalisées permettra à cette exposition de se rendre partout au Canada sans craindre des dommages », a déclaré Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne de la FAE, ajoutant que « lorsque plusieurs personnes se rassemblent pour des projets comme celui-ci, quelque chose de spécial se produit. Ce projet est extrêmement fructueux, nous a non seulement permis de construire des caisses, mais également de nouer des partenariats, de renforcer l’esprit communautaire et d’améliorer les compétences de nos jeunes. »

Le projet a été rendu possible grâce à la subvention pour les programmes communautaires de la Fondation Home Depot Canada. FAE a remis un montant équivalent qui a servi à acheter des matériaux de construction et à payer les jeunes autochtones. Le centre d’amitié autochtone Odawa a gracieusement prêté son atelier d’ébénisterie, ce qui a permis de construire les caisses dans un espace de travail sécuritaire et professionnel. Rip Jones, qui a consacré son temps et son expertise à la conception de caisses d’exposition pour le projet, a également fourni des instructions et des conseils aux jeunes autochtones qui ont fabriqué les caisses. Tim Baptiste a aidé à la construction des caisses et a contribué à la supervision et la formation des jeunes Autochtones en ce qui a trait aux techniques de base en menuiserie et en construction de caisses. Il a également offert les services de son propre personnel pour aider à la conception de ces huit grandes caisses.

Un merci spécial à vous tous pour vos contributions incroyables à la réalisation de ce projet. Nous n’aurions pas pu le faire sans vous !

  • La Fondation Home Depot, subvention de programmes communautaires ;
  • Morgan Hare, directeur général, Centre d’amitié autochtone Odawa ;
  • Rip Jones, Ladedo Visual Concepts pour la conception des caisses ;
  • Jeunes Autochtones : Derek Edwards-Barber, Thomas Moses et Nathan Coté-Spence – formés à la menuiserie de base et à la construction de caisses sur mesure ;
  • Tim Baptiste, Algonquin Landscaping and Property Maintenance pour les nombreuses heures de bénévolat consacrées à la supervision, à la formation de la jeunesse autochtone et à la construction, permettant à votre personnel d’aider et d’assurer des résultats de qualité professionnelle pour ce projet.

Pour plus d’information, veuillez contacter : Teresa Edwards, directrice générale et conseillère juridique interne Fondation autochtone de l’espoir 613 237-4806, poste 303

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir annonce le lancement d’un nouveau projet subventionné par le Gouvernement du Canada afin de d’honorer les Vies et l’Histoire des femmes, des filles et des personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones

(Ottawa, ON) 27 juin, 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir lance un nouveau projet intitulé Waniskahtan – Honorer les Vies et l’Histoire des femmes, des filles et des personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones. Ce projet aidera à instruire et à créer une prise de conscience quant à l’ampleur de la violence faite aux femmes, filles et personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones, et d’identifier les façons de promouvoir leur sûreté et sécurité.

Ce nouveau projet commémoratif est maintenant possible grâce aux investissements de plus de 495,000$ dollars du Gouvernement du Canada pour les deux prochaines années, provenant du Fond commémoratif.  La subvention a été annoncée par l’Honorable Maryan Monsef, Ministre du Développement international et Ministre des Femmes et l’Égalité des genres, le 24 juin 2019.

Waniskahtani est un projet sur deux ans qui permettra à la FAE de travailler avec de nombreuses familles et communautés à travers le Canada afin d’informer et de développer une exposition et un guide d’activités qui honorera la mémoire des leurs. Notre but est de trouver un moyen puissant et posé pour exposer le racisme, le sexisme et la violence que subissent les femmes, les filles et les personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones. Nous voulons créer des environnements plus sécuritaires et prévenir d’autres pertes de vies.

« Depuis près de 20 ans, la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir travaille étroitement avec des centaines de Survivants du Régime des pensionnats autochtones et leurs familles. La Fondation est en bonne position pour travailler avec les individus ayant vécu des traumatismes. Nous savons que de nombreuses femmes disparues  ou  assassinées étaient autrefois des étudiantes des Pensionnats ou ont vécu des impacts intergénérationnels liés aux Pensionnats. Nous avons confiance en nos habiletés à raconter leurs histoires. » A confié le Président de la  Fondation autochtone de l’espoir, Richard Kistabish.

« Avec l’Enquête qui tire à sa fin, il est maintenant temps d’entreprendre la prochaine étape qui consiste à commémorer celles qui sont disparues et assassinées, et de réveiller les Canadiens en les inspirant à s’engager à un environnement sécuritaire et sans violence pour les femmes, les filles et les personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones, » a dit Teresa Edwards, Directive exécutive et Conseillère juridique.

L’exposition itinérante Waniskahtan et le Guide d’activités sur FFADA et 2ELGBTQQIA comptent honorer les vies perdues, augmenter la prise de conscience envers les enjeux qui les mettent à risque, s’adresser à la violence masculine, et promouvoir des actions qui les protègent et qui demandent à ceux qui visitent l’exposition de prendre un engagement personnel à mettre fin à la violence et promouvoir la paix. Waniskahtan est une expression Swampy Cree et veut dire « réveille-toi.» Une fois terminée, l’exposition sera ajoutée à notre collection de 19 expositions, qui peuvent être empruntées par des hôtes gratuitement et qui peuvent aussi circuler à travers le Canada.

Pour plus d’informations concernant la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir, visitez fondationautochtonedelespoir.ca

Pour tout contact médiatique:
Teresa Edwards
Directrice exécutive et Conseillère judiciaire
Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Ph: 613-237-4806 Ext. 303
info@legacyofhope.ca

Fondation autochtone de l’Espoir – Honore et reconnaît l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées et son Rapport final

(Ottawa, ON) 6 juin, 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) tient à reconnaître et honorer tous les Commissaires, employés, Anciens et Porteurs du Savoir, ainsi que les Survivants, les familles et les communautés ayant participé au chemin ayant mené aux conclusions de cette Enquête. L’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées a entamé ses travaux en 2016 et trois ans plus tard a produit son Rapport final, publié lundi, le 3 juin, 2019.

Le Rapport identifie le fondement d’un génocide qui repose sur des structures coloniales comme cause fondamentale derrière le nombre alarmant de femmes et de filles autochtones disparues et assassinées, incluant les personnes bi-spirituelles, lesbiennes, gaies, bisexuelles, transgenres, queer, en questionnement et personnes intersexuées ou asexuelles (2ELGBTQQIA).  Les structures coloniales ayant contribué au génocide incluent la Loi sur les Indiens, des générations entières d’autochtones forcés dans le système des pensionnats, la Rafle des années 1960 où des enfants ont été enlevés de leurs parents, ainsi que des générations d’oppression et de racisme et d’autres violations des droits humains vécus par les Peuples autochtones, particulièrement chez les femmes.

Le Rapport identifie le chemin vers l’avant, incluant de nombreux appels à la justice. Les auteurs du Rapport suggèrent que l’utilisation du terme « recommandation » exprimant ces divers appels ne résonnerait peut-être même pas assez. Ils jugent que ces appels à la justice devraient être vus « comme impératifs et non-optionnels. » Ceux-ci touchent à de nombreux aspects de la société. La FAE souligne particulièrement les appels reliés à l’éducation. Sous les appels visant les éducateurs, particulièrement l’appel 11.1, les auteurs « demandent à tous les établissements d’enseignement primaire, secondaire et postsecondaire et à toutes les administrations scolaires d’éduquer et de sensibiliser le public au sujet des femmes, des filles et des personnes 2ELGBTQQIA autochtones disparues et assassinées, et sur les enjeux et les causes profondes de la violence que ces personnes subissent. » Sous les Appels à la justice pour tous les Canadiens, à la section 15.2, ils demandent à tous les Canadiens d’entreprendre un effort de « décolonisation en apprenant la véritable histoire du Canada et l’histoire des Autochtones dans leur région. Découvrir et célébrer l’histoire, les cultures, la fierté et la diversité des peuples autochtones, reconnaître la terre sur laquelle on vit et son importance historique et actuelle pour les communautés autochtones locales. »

L’éducation est un outil essentiel en société afin de donner l’élan nécessaire et propice à l’élaboration de relations et structures saines. En prenant connaissance et en éduquant les Canadiens quant au colonialisme du passé et du présent, tous seront mieux informés et ainsi mieux placés pour entreprendre des actions envers des relations saines et respectueuses entre Peuples autochtones et non-autochtones. C’est pour ces raisons que des cours portant sur les Premières Nations, les Métis et les Peuples Inuits devraient être obligatoires dans les écoles publiques. Les connaissances à propos des Peuples autochtones doivent devenir des connaissances communes. La FAE veut encourager un leadership éducatif à travers le Canada qui cherche à mettre en place ces appels à la justice et est prête à amener un soutien aux écoles avec ses ressources.

La Fondation Autochtone de l’Espoir est une organisation nationale autochtone à but non lucratif dont le mandat est d’instruire, de conscientiser et de comprendre le fléau causé par le Régime des pensionnats et la Rafle des années soixante, incluant les effets et les impacts intergénérationnels sur les Premières nations, les Inuits et les Métis. L’accomplissement de notre mandat contribue à l’avancement de la réconciliation entre les générations de Survivants et leurs familles et de les Canadiens afin d’entreprendre des actions qui nous mèneront vers la Réconciliation.

Pour tout contact médiatique:
Teresa Edwards
Directrice exécutive et Conseillère judiciaire
Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Ph: 613-237-4806 Ext. 303
info@legacyofhope.ca

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir félicite Docteur Cindy Swanson pour l’obtention de son Doctorat de Philsophie en Éducation (Ph.D.)

(Ottawa, ON) 2 avril, 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir félicite Dr Cindy Swanson pour l’obtention de son Doctorat en Éducation élémentaire, au Centre de Recherche pour les Professeurs en Éducation et Développement (CRTED) dans la Faculté d’Éducation élémentaire de l’Université d’Alberta. Son travail de recherche consiste en une Enquête narrative travaillant en parallèle avec le Curriculum familial concernant l’expérience des enfants et familles autochtones en milieu urbain.

Dr Swanson est Métisse et réside à Edmonton, Alberta, elle s’implique dans de nombreux projets depuis longtemps. Elle a été nommée au Conseil national des jeunes Métis en tant que membre provincial. En 1998, elle s’est jointe au Conseil d’administration de la Fondation autochtone de la Guérison en tant que représentante de la jeunesse lorsqu’elle était étudiante en troisième année de son diplôme en éducation à l’Université de l’Alberta. Elle a ensuite enseigné et appris avec les enfants et les familles dans les classes primaires de la Commission scolaire publique d’Edmonton. Cindy travaille au sein du Conseil d’administration de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir depuis 2005 et y sert maintenant à titre de Secrétaire.

« L’expérience du Dr Swanson dans le milieu de l’éducation a contribué à notre programme de développement de curriculum à travers les années, » dit Teresa Edwards, Directrice Exécutive et Conseillère judicaire de l’organisation. Elle ajoute, « Nous sommes honorés que Dr Swanson continue de siéger sur notre Conseil d’administration et nous sommes fiers de l’avoir en tant que force importante dans notre mandat éducatif. »

La Fondation Autochtone de l’Espoir est une organisation nationale autochtone à but non lucratif dont le mandat est d’instruire, de conscientiser et de comprendre le fléau causé par le Régime des pensionnats, incluant les effets et les impacts intergénérationnels sur les Premières nations, les Inuits et les Métis, en prêtant un soutien aux Survivants et Survivantes dans leur chemin vers la guérison. L’accomplissement de notre mandat contribue à l’avancement de la réconciliation entre les générations, ainsi qu’entre les peuples Autochtones et non-autochtones du Canada.

Pour tout contact médiatique:
Teresa Edwards
Directrice exécutive et Conseillère judiciaire
Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Ph: 613-237-4806 Ext. 303
info@legacyofhope.ca

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir félicite Docteur Cook pour l’obtention du Prix national Indspire pour Éducation et Accomplissement

(Ottawa, ON 25 Mars, 2019 –  La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir félicite Dr Marlyn Cook pour l’obtention du Prix national Indspire (Santé 2019) pour ses 30 années de service en tant que médecin de famille sur les Réserves. Non seulement a-t-elle servi sa communauté pendant très longtemps, mais elle est la première femme Cris à être diplômée de la Faculté de médecine de l’Université du Manitoba en tant que médecin. Nous sommes fiers que Marlyn ait siégé au Conseil d’administration de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir depuis 2005 et qu’elle continue d’y être active.

En provenance de la Nation de Misipawistik Cree, au Manitoba, Marlyn a débuté sa carrière en santé en tant docteur. Après avoir été témoin du racisme dont les Peuples autochtones ont souffert dans le système de santé, Marlyn a décidé qu’elle deviendrait Docteur afin qu’elle puisse défendre les droits et besoins des Peuples autochtones de l’intérieur.

À travers les années, Dr Cook a commencé à y inclure des cérémonies autochtones qu’elle incorpore dans ses pratiques de l’Ouest afin de ramener un sens de fierté, d’identité et d’estime de soi.  Dr Cook est maintenant de retour dans sa ville natale en tant que médecin de famille à l’Institut autochtone de Santé et de Guérison Ongomiizwin au sein de la Faculté des sciences à l’Université du Manitoba et elle continue de trouver des moyens d’incorporer la guérison traditionnelle dans le système de santé du Manitoba.

« La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir cherche à raconter la vraie histoire du Canada et les impacts négatifs du Régime des pensionnats autochtones qui continuent d’affecter les Peuples autochtones. C’est de cette perspective que nous félicitons le travail de Dr Marlyn Cook et de sa décision révolutionnaire d’intégrer les cérémonies autochtones dans sa pratique et ses efforts soutenus envers son activisme pour effacer le racisme qui existe dans le système de santé canadien, » dit Teresa Edwards, Directrice exécutive et Conseillère juridique pour l’organisation. Elle continue, « nous sommes très fiers d’avoir une femme autochtone si accomplie au sein de notre Conseil d’administration. »

La Fondation Autochtone de l’Espoir est une organisation nationale autochtone à but non lucratif dont le mandat est d’instruire, de conscientiser et de comprendre le fléau causé par le Régime des pensionnats, incluant les effets et les impacts intergénérationnels sur les Premières nations, les Inuits et les Métis, en prêtant un soutien aux Survivants et Survivantes dans leur chemin vers la guérison. L’accomplissement de notre mandat contribue à l’avancement de la réconciliation entre les générations, ainsi qu’entre les peuples Autochtones et non-autochtones du Canada.

Pour tout contact médiatique:

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD., Directrice exécutive et Conseillère judiciaire
Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Téléphone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir applaudit l’annonce du Gouvernement fédéral concernant l’entente avec les Survivants des Écoles de jour

(Ottawa, ON) 25 mars, 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir applaudit la récente négociation entreprise par le Gouvernement fédéral pour régler la cause judiciaire pour les anciens étudiants autochtones des Écoles de jour au lieu de régler celle-ci en cour. Cette action judiciaire a été lancée par les Peuples autochtones (et leurs familles) qui ont ces École de jour et qui y ont souffert et subis des traumatismes. En ce moment, l’entente en est une de principe et devra attendre une ratification de la part de la cour.

L’entente négociée inclue aussi du financement pour des projets qui soutiennent la guérison et la santé des individus concernés, incluant leurs communautés, et inclue aussi des initiatives se rattachant à l’éducation, la langue, la culture et la commémoration. La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir encourage le financement de projets qui soutiennent la revitalisation de la culture et qui vise les individus et les communautés.

Une partie vitale du processus de guérison pour les Peuples autochtone est la revitalisation de leur culture, les enseignements, la spiritualité, la santé et le bien-être. Le but de ces écoles était de retirer à ces Peuples leurs façons de vivre et d’être en visant d’abord leurs enfants. Maintenant, en réponse à ceci, nous avons besoin d’initiative et de supports communautaires qui s’adressent tant aux individus présents qu’aux familles et aux communautés, dans le but de faire de véritables efforts de guérison quant aux dommages commis et à rebâtir des connexions.

Dans l’avenir, la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir aimerait voir le Gouvernement fédéral utiliser plus d’entente négociées au lieu de litiges judiciaires, afin d’assurer que ces ententes impactent non seulement les individus concernés mais qu’elles s’adressent aux impacts sur la communauté entière. Les Écoles de jour, comme le Régime des pensionnats autochtones, ont été mis en opération dans le but de coloniser les étudiants et de les séparer de leur langue, leur culture et leur identité spirituelle. De plus, comme le Régime des pensionnats, de nombreux étudiants des Écoles de jour ont vécu des abus, incluant des abus physiques et sexuels. Ces écoles étaient aussi opérées par le Gouvernement fédéral et administrées par les Églises. Les anciens étudiants continuent de subir les effets des traumatismes complexes qu’ils ont subi lorsqu’ils se trouvaient dans les soins de ceux qui avaient le devoir de les protéger et de les voir grandir. Il s’agit d’un traumatisme qui persiste chez les anciens étudiants, leurs familles et leurs communautés. De tels dommages requièrent un énorme soutient, des traitements, et une revitalisation culturelle afin d’aider ces individus et leurs familles à non seulement survivre, mais à retrouver la prospérité.

Les détails de l’entente proposée incluent :

  • Une compensation de 10 000$ pour les Autochtones qui ont vécu des dommages lorsqu’ils fréquentaient une École de jour du Gouvernement fédéral et une compensation de 50 000$ à 200 000$ pour les Autochtones ayant subi des abus physiques et sexuels lorsqu’ils étaient confiés aux soins de ces écoles; et
  • Un investissement additionnel de 200 million de dollars qui sera donné à la McLean Day School Corporation. Ces fonds seront utilisés pour soutenir des projets additionnels – des initiatives telles que la guérison, la santé, l’éducation, la langue et la culture, incluant la commémoration en soutient aux étudiants et leurs communautés.

À propos de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir:

La Fondation Autochtone de l’Espoir est une organisation nationale autochtone à but non lucratif dont le mandat est d’instruire, de conscientiser et de comprendre le fléau causé par le Régime des pensionnats, incluant les effets et les impacts intergénérationnels sur les Premières nations, les Inuits et les Métis, en prêtant un soutien aux Survivants et Survivantes dans leur chemin vers la guérison. L’accomplissement de notre mandat contribue à l’avancement de la réconciliation entre les générations, ainsi qu’entre les peuples Autochtones et non-autochtones du Canada.

Pour tout contact médiatique:

Teresa Edwards, B.A. JD., Directrice exécutive et Conseillère judiciaire
Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Téléphone:  613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir applaudit les excuses du Gouvernement du Saskatchewan quant à sa participation dans la Rafle des années soixante

(Ottawa, ON) 11 Janvier, 2019 – La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est heureuse d’apprendre que le Premier ministre Scott Moe ait présenté des excuses formelles aux Survivants de la Rafle des années soixante en Saskatchewan plus tôt cette semaine.

« Le 7 janvier 2019 sera retenu dans l’histoire puisque que le Premier ministre a émis des excuses officielles aux Survivants de la Rafle des années soixante en Saskatchewan. Les excuses étaient dues depuis longtemps et sont un premier pas afin de faire avancer la Réconciliation envers les Peuples autochtones du Saskatchewan, et à travers Turtle Island, » a dit Adam North Peigan, Membre du Conseil d’administration de la FAE et Président de la Sixties Scoop Indigenous Society of Alberta.

Entre 1950 et la fin des années quatre-vingt, des milliers d’enfants autochtones ont été enlevés des leurs familles et de leurs communautés lors de rafles qui les ont menés chez des familles adoptives non-autochtones ou en maisons d’accueil et ce, bien loin de leurs familles. Cette pratique, communément appelée « La Rafle des années soixante », a contribué à la perte de la culture autochtone, l’histoire, l’identité et la langue de ces individus et a aussi causé de la solitude, une faible estime de soi, un manque d’identité, des problèmes de santé mentale, des dépendances, des suicides, de l’itinérance, des incarcérations et une mauvaise santé chez ceux-ci.

« Même si les excuses sont symboliques et peuvent être mandatées par la Loi au sein d’une entente, j’espère que celles-ci contribueront à des engagements positifs et des actions concrètes qui feront la différence pour ceux dont les vies en ont souffert, » a dit Teresa Edwards, Directrice exécutive et Conseillère légale de la FAE. « La rafle du Millénaire est un terme utilisé par plusieurs afin de décrire les nombreux enfants qui continuent d’être approchés par le Système de protection de la jeunesse pour des raisons liées à la pauvreté, le racisme et l’imposition des valeurs des autres sur les Peuples autochtones. Les Gouvernements doivent s’assurer que nous ayons appris des erreurs du passé et que nous travaillions ensembles afin de prévenir d’autres crises comme celles-ci à l’avenir. »

La FAE applaudit les efforts entrepris aujourd’hui par le Gouvernement du Saskatchewan qui a admis ses torts et qui a démontré son engagement envers la Réconciliation et son avancement. Nous espérons que d’autres Gouvernements marcheront du même pas.

À propos de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir: La Fondation autochtone de l’espoir (FAE) est une organisation autochtone nationale à but non lucratif qui cherche à instruire, à comprendre et à faire prendre conscience des impacts du Régime des pensionnats, incluant la Rafle des années soixante et les douleurs intergénérationnelles causées aux Première Nations, Peuples Inuits et Métis. Notre organisation contribue aussi à supporter le long chemin de la guérison pour les Survivants. Remplir notre mandat nous permet de contribuer à la Réconciliation à travers les générations autochtones et non-autochtones du Canada.

Pour toutes questions médiatiques :
Teresa Edwards
Directrice exécutive et Conseillère légale de la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
Téléphone : 613-237-4806 Ext. 303 info@legacyofhope.ca

(Ottawa, ON) 27 novembre, 2018 – Aujourd’hui, la Fondation autochtone de l’espoir
(FAE) se joint à la communauté suite au décès de Lesley Parlane, une jeune femme
autochtone, artiste passionnée et une raconteuse créative, qui nous a quitté si tôt.
Notre Président, Richard Kistabish, offre ses sincères condoléances de sa part et de celle des
employés de la FAE et de son Conseil d’administration à la famille, les amis et la
communauté qui connaissait et aimait Lesley Parlane. « Nous offrons nos prières à la famille
de Lesley et ses amis, ainsi qu’à tous ceux et celles qui ont été touchés par sa présence et son
implication dans sa communauté, » a-t-il souligné, ajoutant, « la FAE est très privilégiée et
honorée d’avoir eu l’opportunité de travailler avec Lesley, et nous sommes reconnaissant
envers sa contribution et sa participation à notre exposition Bi-Giwen: Retourner chez soi –
La vérité derrière la Rafle des années soixante. »

Lesley Parlane a rendu l’âme au monde des esprits samedi, le 24 novembre 2018, après un
courageux combat avec un cancer du sein. Mme Parlane (Dakota/Salteaux) faisait partie de
la Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation à Fort Qu’Appelle, en Saskatchewan, et était basée à
Ottawa, Ontario depuis 1998.

Lesley Parlane a partagé son expérience de vie en tant que femme autochtone vivant au
Canada. Elle a parlé ouvertement d’être une Survivante intergénérationnelle du temps des
Pensionnats, d’avoir été adoptée suite à la Rafle des années soixante et de son chemin vers un
retour à sa culture, du besoin de se reconnecter avec sa famille, faire le deuil sur ses pertes et
l’importance de vivre sainement en prenant soin de soi-même, de guérir et de récupérer.
Teresa Edwards, Directrice exécutive et Conseillère légale de la FAE, a prononcé que,
«Mme Parlane était une inspiration pour plusieurs. Son travail acharné et sa participation à
faire connaître de nombreux enjeux, dont ceux de la Rafle des années soixante, continueront
d’instruire et d’informer le gens pour les années à venir. Lesley était une femme très forte et
puissante qui voulait partager ses histoires afin que les autres puissent en tirer profit en
comprenant et en bâtissant une empathie pour la cause autochtone. Elle a aussi su contribuer
et honorer le chemin vers la redécouverte et la guérison, et a pavé le sentier vers « chez soi »
pour ceux qui ont été retirés de leurs familles. Elle nous manquera beaucoup.» a ajouté Mme
Edwards.

Avant les années soixante, les enfants autochtones étaient retirés de leurs familles, souvent par la
force, et ensuite amenés en familles d’accueil ou adoptés par des familles non-autochtones
très loin de leur communauté d’origine et même à travers le globe. C’est ce que nous
appelons maintenant la Rafle des années soixante, dont les impacts continuent de se faire sentir
aujourd’hui.

Lesley Parlane fait partie de l’exposition Bi-Giwen: Retourner chez soi – La vérité derrière
la Rafle des années soixante de la FAE, qui explore l’expérience des Survivants de la Rafle.

Developpée en partenariat avec le National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network,
cette exposition innovatrice et complexe présente les témoignages de douze Survivants
autochtones de la Rafle des années soixante et reflète sur leur douleur, leur perte mais aussi sur leur
force, courage et leur résilience.
L’interview avec Lesley Parlane pour le projet Bi-Giwen peut être visionnée ici :
http://www.legacyofhope.ca/bigiwen/lesleyparlane.html

et reflète sur leur douleur, leur perte mais aussi sur leur
force, courage et leur résilience.
L’interview avec Lesley Parlane pour le projet Bi-Giwen peut être visionnée ici :
http://www.legacyofhope.ca/bigiwen/lesleyparlane.html